Takakura Composting Method (TCM) as An Appropriate Environmental Technology for Urban Waste Management Case study of Hai Phong, Viet Nam

Main Article Content

Fritz Akhmad Nuzir Shiko Hayashi Koji Takakura

Abstract

The term of "Appropriate Technology (AT)", introduced by Schumacher which refers to all kind of technologies including environmental technology, has been since developed into a global discourse on technology advancement and its impacts of implemThe term of "Appropriate Technology (AT)", introduced by Schumacher which refers to all kind of technologies including environmental technology, has been since developed into a global discourse on technology advancement and its impacts of implementation on human civilisation as seen from various perspectives. The technology could also relate to the basic, fundamental yet innovative technology. Using this perpective, Takakura Composting Method (TCM) always prioritise to be integrated with the local context to have more efficient and effective implementation of its method. This study aims to understand the implementation of TCM on the case study in Hai Phong, Viet Nam, which is a sister city of Kitakyushu which would provide an important base for formulation of a development model for further appropriate and sustainable implementation. This study firstly examined relevant references and extracted the most important socio-economic and cultural key-factors of AT such as: financial mechanisms and cost affordability; technological adaptability and independence; social and cultural acceptability; local needs, demands, and resources; community participation and involvement; commitment from local government; environment consciousness; and continuity and long-term impact. This was followed by a descriptive analysis based each key-factor within the on-going implementation of TCM in Hai Phong. Finally authors concluded that TCM mainly reflects all key factors within its implementation. However, the absence of proper waste separation and compost users, and the issue of how to use the existing facility appropriately in order to optimise the production are the main challenges for self-dependance and the continuity of TCM development in Hai Phong.entation on human civilisation as seen from various perspectives. The technology could also relate to the basic, fundamental yet innovative technology. Using this perpective, Takakura Composting Method (TCM) always prioritise to be integrated with the local context to have more efficient and effective implementation of its method. This study aims to understand the implementation of TCM on the case study in Hai Phong, Viet Nam, which is a sister city of Kitakyushu which would provide an important base for formulation of a development model for further appropriate and sustainable implementation. This study firstly examined relevant references and extracted the most important socio-economic and cultural key-factors of AT such as: financial mechanisms and cost affordability; technological adaptability and independence; social and cultural acceptability; local needs, demands, and resources; community participation and involvement; commitment from local government; environment consciousness; and continuity and long-term impact. This was followed by a descriptive analysis based each key-factor within the on-going implementation of TCM in Hai Phong. Finally authors concluded that TCM mainly reflects all key factors within its implementation. However, the absence of proper waste separation and compost users, and the issue of how to use the existing facility appropriately in order to optimise the production are the main challenges for self-dependance and the continuity of TCM development in Hai Phong.

Article Details

How to Cite
Nuzir, F., Hayashi, S., & Takakura, K. (2019). Takakura Composting Method (TCM) as An Appropriate Environmental Technology for Urban Waste Management. International Journal of Building, Urban, Interior and Landscape Technology (BUILT), 13(1), 67 - 82. Retrieved from https://www.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/BUILT/article/view/183252
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