THE EFFECTS OF COMBINED COMPRESSION BAND AND ACTIVE RECOVERY ON KNEE EXTENSOR MUSCLES AFTER EXERCISE-INDUCED MUSCLE SORENESS IN SEDENTARY HEALTHY MALE STUDENTS

Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Science, Thammasat University, Pathum thani 12120

  • Thanawat KITSUKSAN Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Science, Thammasat University, Pathum thani 12120
  • Tamonwan KWANNUI Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Science, Thammasat University, Pathum thani 12120
  • Nathaphon JIRASAKULSUK Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Science, Thammasat University, Pathum thani 12120
  • Wipada THAWEENITHIKON Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Science, Thammasat University, Pathum thani 12120
Keywords: Recovery / Exercise-induced muscle soreness / Compression band / Plyometric

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of compression band combined with active recovery on knee extensor muscles after exercise-induced muscle soreness in sedentary healthy male students.Twenty sedentary healthy male students aged between 18-25 years were randomly allocated to compression band combined with active recovery strategy (CA) (n=10) or active recovery strategy (AR) (n=10) for 30 minutes after completed 10 x 10 drop jumps from a 0.6-m box to induce muscle damage. Indirect indices of muscle damage (pain scale, muscle circumference and peak torque) were assessed before and after exercise-induced muscle soreness for 1, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours respectively.The results showed that after exercise for one hour, both groups showed a statistically significant increase in pain scale (p < 0.05) and muscle circumference compared before the exercise (p < 0.05) but there was a statistically significant decrease in peak torque of knee extensor muscles compared before the exercise (p < 0.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences of time between groups throughout the recovery period. In Conclusion the application of combined compression band along with active recovery exercise had no significant effect on attenuating muscle soreness, reducing muscle circumference and modulating the decline in muscle peak torque of knee extensor muscles which were similar to that observed in active recovery alone.
(Journal of Sports Science and Technology 2018; 18(2): 61-72)
Key words: Recovery / Exercise-induced muscle soreness / Compression band / Plyometric
*Corresponding author: Thanawat KITSUKSAN Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Science, Thammasat University, Pathum thani 12120 E-mail: Thanawat.k@allied.tu.ac.th

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Published
2018-12-24
Section
Research Article