Safety, Effectiveness and Satisfaction of Postpartum Mothers in Yoofai Treatment Based on Thai Traditional Medicine

Main Article Content

Supparas Oatsawaphonthanaphat Vichai Chokevivat Wichai Srikam

Abstract

Yoofai is a process of rehabilitating the postpartum mothers’ health to normal or almost normal life rapidly., but postpartum mothers chose to use the method of  Yoofai treatment at public hospital lower than their targeted goal in spite of having been treated for along time. This may be because they think that safety and effectiveness of  Yoofai treatment of postpartum mothers, as well as their satisfaction toward Yoofai treatment are still doubtful. The purposes of this research are  to analyze safety and effectiveness of Yoofai treatment of postpartum mothers, and evaluate satisfaction of postpartum mothers toward Yoofai treatment. The sample was chosen by using selective sampling from the population of postpartum mothers in Nakornpathom Province with the number of 30 persons. The data were gathered between May and July, 2016. The statistical techniques used for analyzing the data were percentage, mean, standard deviation (S.D.), and repeated measures ANOVA at the significance level of 0.05. The research findings were that: 1) The postpartum mothers who had the Yoofai treatment were safe at the very high level (96.67%). 2) After Yoofai treatment, involution of uterus of all postpartum mothers reduced at the low level (100 %). Ninety pecent was no perineal pain and 93.33 percent was no body pain. 3) When comparing the effectiveness, the high of uterus, perineal pain, and body pain. between before-Yoofai and after-Yoofai treatment was  statistically significant different at α 0.05. And 4) the postpartum mothers were satisfied with Yoofai treatment at the highest level (80 %). These research findings confirm that the Yoofai treatment was safe and helpful in reducing involution of uterus, perineal pain and body pain 

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Original Articles
Author Biographies

Supparas Oatsawaphonthanaphat

Doctor of Philosophy Program in Applied Thai Traditional Medicine: Ph.D. (Applied Thai Traditional Medicine), Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, 1 U-Thong Nok Road, Dusit, Bangkok, 10300, Thailand

Department of medical sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, 11000, Thailand

The Royal Society, Sanarm Suarpar, Bangkok 10300, Thailand

Vichai Chokevivat

Doctor of Philosophy Program in Applied Thai Traditional Medicine: Ph.D. (Applied Thai Traditional Medicine), Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, 1 U-Thong Nok Road, Dusit, Bangkok, 10300, Thailand

Department of medical sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, 11000, Thailand

The Royal Society, Sanarm Suarpar, Bangkok 10300, Thailand

Wichai Srikam

Doctor of Philosophy Program in Applied Thai Traditional Medicine: Ph.D. (Applied Thai Traditional Medicine), Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, 1 U-Thong Nok Road, Dusit, Bangkok, 10300, Thailand

Department of medical sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, 11000, Thailand

The Royal Society, Sanarm Suarpar, Bangkok 10300, Thailand

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