DEVELOPMENT OF A SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS BASED ON THE CONSTRUCTIVIST THEORY TO ENHANCE LEARNING ACHIEVMENT AND HIGHER ORDER THINKING ABILITY OF MATHAYOM SUKSA II STUDENTS

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จเร ลวนางกูร (Jarea Lavananggoon) ทวีศักดิ์ จินดานุรักษ์ (Tweesak Chindanuruk) นวลจิตต์ เชาวกีรติพงศ์ (Nuanjid Chaowakeratipong) ไสว ฟักขาว (Sawai Fakkao)

Abstract

The purposes of this research were 1) to develop a science instructional process based on the Constructivist Theor, 2) to compare the post-learning science learning achievement of the students who learned according to the steps of the science instructional process based on the Constructivist Theory with the counterpart learning achievement of the students who learned under the conventional teaching method, and 3)  to compare the post-learning higher order thinking ability of the students who learned according to the steps of the science instructional process based on the Constructivist Theory with the counterpart thinking ability of the students who learned under the conventional teaching method. This research was comprised two steps: (1) development of a science instructional process, and (2) try-out of the developed instructional process. The sample is a Mathayom Suksa II students by cluster sampling. Were 38 students of the experimental group and 4 students of control group. Research instruments were a science learning achievement test, and a higher order thinking ability test. Statistics employed for data analysis were the mean, standard deviation, and t-test.


            The finding  1) The developed science instructional process was composed of the instructional process consisted of the following seven steps, (1) the problem confrontation step,  (2) the knowledge survey step, (3) the knowledge verification step, (4) the knowledge sharing step, (5)the reflection of thought step, (6)the knowledge synthesis step, and (7)the knowledge application.  2) The experimental group had post-learning achievement scores significantly higher than the counterpart scores of the control group students at the .01 level of statistical significance.  3) The experimental group students had post-learning higher order thinking ability scores significantly higher than the counterpart scores of the control group students at the .01 level of statistical significance.

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