THE EFFECT OF THE BRAIN EXERCISE PROGRAM APPLYING NEUROBIC EXERCISE THEORY ON DEPRESSION AMONG OLDER ADULTS WITH MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT

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จารุวรรณ ก้านศรี นภัสสร ยอดทองดี ศศิวิมล บูรณะเรข

Abstract

This quasi-experimental study aimed to examine the effects of the brain exercise program applying neurobic exercise theory on depression among older adults with mild cognitive impairment. The sample composed of 60 older adults with cognitive impairment evaluated using Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores of less than 25 points, with individuals with no severe communicable illnesses, no uncontrollable chronic diseases, and the ability to communicate in Thai. Sample was arranged into experimental and control groups of 30 subjects each. The experimental group received the brain exercise program applying neurobic exercise theory. The program was offered in 8 weekly sessions lasting for 120 minutes each over a period of 8 consecutive weeks. The control group received routine care only. Two research instruments were used in the study as the following. The brain exercise program applying neurobic exercise theory was tested for content validity using three qualified professionals and was tried out with 8 older adults with mild cognitive impairment. The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) has an acceptable reliability with Cronbach’s alpha coefficient score of 0.72. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics Chi-square test, Fisher's Exact test and t-test. Research findings were as follows:


  1. After participating in the program, mean score of depression of the older adults with mild cognitive impairment in the experimental group (Mean=5.57, S.D.=0.50) was statistically significantly lower than the pre-test score (Mean=8.40, S.D.=0.77, p<.001).

  2. The difference in mean scores of depressions of the older adults with mild cognitive impairment before and after participating in the experimental group ( =2.83, S.D. =.91) was statistically significant higher than the control group receiving routine care only ( =.02, S.D.=1.10, p<.001).

The brain exercise program applying neurobic exercise theory could be used to reduce depression among older adults with mild cognitive impairment in the community.

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How to Cite
ก้านศรีจ., ยอดทองดีน., & บูรณะเรขศ. (2018). THE EFFECT OF THE BRAIN EXERCISE PROGRAM APPLYING NEUROBIC EXERCISE THEORY ON DEPRESSION AMONG OLDER ADULTS WITH MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT. Journal of Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Bangkok, 34(3), 65-76. Retrieved from https://www.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/bcnbangkok/article/view/168625
Section
บทความวิจัย

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