A Causal model of factors influencing english learning achievement of grade 12 students at the demonstration schools under the offce the higher education commission, ministry of education

Main Article Content

Somsiri Suraprasert Sittiporn Niyomsrisomsak Sompong Panhoon

Abstract

The purposes of this research were to investigate the factors influencing
English learning achievement of grade 12 students at the Demonstration Schools under
the Offce of the Higher Education Commission, Ministry of Education, and to test the
congruence of a hypothetical model of factors influencing English learning achievement
and empirical data of students.
The sample of the study consisted of 620 students studying in grade 12 in the
frst semester of the academic year 2017 of 13 Demonstration Schools under the Offce
of the Higher Education Commission, Ministry of Education. There were six proposed
latent variables namely, Student Characteristics, School Support, Home Environment,
Peer Support, Student Learning Behaviors, and Student Learning Achievement. The
research instrument was a set of questionnaires on the six latent variables. Descriptive
statistics were utilized for the data analysis through Mean ( X), SD. and LISREL program
was used for path analysis and testing the congruence of the causal relationship model.
The fndings revealed the causal model of factors influencing English learning
achievement signifcantly ft the empirical data after it was modifed. The ft statistic
were: χ2= 83.882, df = 68, p = 0.093, χ2/df = 1.234, RMSEA = 0.019, NFI = 0.996, NNFI
= 0.998, CFI = 0.999, RMR = 0.019, SRMR = 0.019, GFI = 0.986 and AGFI = 0.961.
Based on the fnal structural equation model, the fndings can be summarized
as follows:
1. The total effect of School Support was 0.363. Its direct effect on students’
achievement was 0.142 while its indirect effect via Student Characteristics and Students
Learning Behaviors was 0.221.
2. The total effect of Home Environment was 0.200. Its indirect effect via Student Characteristics and Student Learning Behaviors was 0.200.
3. The total effect of Peer Support was 0.173. Its indirect effect via Student
Characteristics and Student Learning Behaviors was 0.173.
4. The total effect of Student Characteristics was 0.444. Its direct effect on students’ achievement was 0.388 while its indirect effect via Student Learning Behaviors
was 0.056.
5. The total effect of Student Learning Behaviors  was 0.305. Its direct effect on
students’ achievement was 0.305.

Keywords

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

Section
บทความวิจัย (Research Paper)
Author Biography

Sittiporn Niyomsrisomsak, Ed.D. in Educational Administration, Asst.prof., Faculty of Education, Burapha University

The purposes of this research were to investigate the factors influencing
English learning achievement of grade 12 students at the Demonstration Schools under
the Offce of the Higher Education Commission, Ministry of Education, and to test the
congruence of a hypothetical model of factors influencing English learning achievement
and empirical data of students.
The sample of the study consisted of 620 students studying in grade 12 in the
frst semester of the academic year 2017 of 13 Demonstration Schools under the Offce
of the Higher Education Commission, Ministry of Education. There were six proposed
latent variables namely, Student Characteristics, School Support, Home Environment,
Peer Support, Student Learning Behaviors, and Student Learning Achievement. The
research instrument was a set of questionnaires on the six latent variables. Descriptive
statistics were utilized for the data analysis through Mean ( X), SD. and LISREL program
was used for path analysis and testing the congruence of the causal relationship model.
The fndings revealed the causal model of factors influencing English learning
achievement signifcantly ft the empirical data after it was modifed. The ft statistics
were: χ2= 83.882, df = 68, p = 0.093, χ2/df = 1.234, RMSEA = 0.019, NFI = 0.996, NNFI
= 0.998, CFI = 0.999, RMR = 0.019, SRMR = 0.019, GFI = 0.986 and AGFI = 0.961.
Based on the fnal structural equation model, the fndings can be summarized
as follows:
1. The total effect of School Support was 0.363. Its direct effect on students’
achievement was 0.142 while its indirect effect via Student Characteristics and Students
Learning Behaviors was 0.221.
2. The total effect of Home Environment was 0.200. Its indirect effect via Student Characteristics and Student Learning Behaviors was 0.200.
3. The total effect of Peer Support was 0.173. Its indirect effect via Student
Characteristics and Student Learning Behaviors was 0.173.
4. The total effect of Student Characteristics was 0.444. Its direct effect on students’ achievement was 0.388 while its indirect effect via Student Learning Behaviors
was 0.056.
5. The total effect of Student Learning Behaviors was 0.305. Its direct effect on
students’ achievement was 0.305

References

Alschuler, A. S. (1969). The effects of classroom structure on achievement motivation and
academic performance. Educational Technology, 9(8), 19-24.
Au, K. H. 1998. Social constructivism and the school literacy of students of divers
backgrounds. Journal of Literacy Research 30 (2): 297- 319.
Baker, D.A., Beckingham, K.M., Armstrong, J.D. (2007) Functional dissection of the neural
substrates for gravitaxic maze behavior in Drosophila melanogaster, J. Camp.
Neural, 501(5): 756-764.
Brown, B. (1990). Peer groups and peer cultures. In S. Feldman, & G. Elliot (Eds.), At the
Threshold: The Developing Adolescent (pp. 171-196). Cambridge, MA: Harvard
University Press.
Bogenschneider, K. (1997) Parental Involvement in Adolescent Schooling: A Proximal
Process with Transcontexual Validity. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 59,
718-733.
Candlin, C., & Mercer, N. (2001). English language teaching in its social context: A reader.
London: Routledge in association wih Macquaric University and the Open
University.
Choy, S. C. (2002). An investigation into the changes in perceptions and attitudes
towards learning English in a Malaysian college. International Conference.
Costa, A., A. Foucart, S. Hayakawa, M. Aparici, J. Apesteguia, J. Heafner, and B. Keysar,
2014. Your morals depend on language, PLOS ONE 9 (4) : 1-7. Retrieved from
http://psychology.uchicago.edu/people/faculty/MoralForeign.pdf
Crosnoe, R., Johnson, M. K., & Elder, G. H. (2004). Intergenerational bonding in school:
the Behavioral and contextual correlates of student-teacher relationships.
Sociology of Education, 77, 60-81.
Crystal, D. (1997). The Cambridge, UK: Cambridge encyclopedia of Language. Cambridge,
UK: Cambridge University Press.
Graddol, D. (2006). English next, London: The British Council.
Hair, J.F.J., Black, W.C., Babin, B.J., & Anderson, R.E. (2010). Multivariate Data Analysis
(7thed). Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.
Hartup, W. W., & Abecassis, M. (2002). Friends and enemies. In P. Smith & C. Hart (Eds.),
Blackwell handbook of childhood social development (pp. 285-306). Oxford:
Blackwell and Pam.
Hoy, W. K., & Miskel, C. G. (1996). Educational Administration, theory and practices.
New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc.
Joreskog, K.G. & Sorbom, D. (1993). LISREL 8: Structural Equation Modeling with the
SIMPLIS Command Language. Chicago: Scientifc Software International.
Khoo Steve, & Ainsley John (2005). Attitudes, intentions and participation. Longitudinal
Survey of Australia Youth, Australian Council for Educational Research,
Camberwell, Victory, Australia.
Lepper, M. R., Corpus, J. H., & Lyengar, S. S. (2005). Intrinsic and extrinsic motivational
orientations in the classroom: Age differences and academic correlates. Journal
of Educational Psychology, 97(2), 184-196.
National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). (1997). Father’s involvement in their
children’ s school. Washington, D. C.: U. S. Department of Education. National
Student Exchange Retrieved from: http://www.nse.org/. Offce for National
Standards and Quality Assessment, O-NET reports (2018). Retrieved June, 2018
from http://www.onesqua.or.th/onesqua/th/download/index.php.?
Strongh, J., Berg, C., & Meegan, S. (2001). Friendship and gender differences in task
and social interpretations of peer collaborative problem solving. Social
Development, 10, 1-22.
Vygotsky, L. S. 1987. Thinking and speech. In The collected works of L.S. Vygotsky,
Volume1: Problems of general psychology. Translated by N. Minick and edited
by R. W. Reiber And A.S. Carton, 39 – 285. New York: Plenum. (Orig. pub. 1934.)