The Buddhist Administrative Method of the Monastery Meditation Centers

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Nun Nerashar Saksirisampant Surapon Suyaprom

Abstract

The purposes of this qualitative research were 1) to study the Buddhist Administrative Method and theories for the development of the monastery meditation centers, 2) to study in general the administration of the monastery meditation centers, 3) to compare the differences between Buddhist Administrative Method of the Sanghas and the householders administration, and 4) to manage the model of the Buddhist Administrative Method and the development of the monastery meditation centers. The respondents were 24 persons from six meditation centers, and in-depth interview and focus group discussion with the key informants were employed to gather data that were analyzed using the content analysis technique. The research findings were as follows: 1) The Buddhist Administrative Method was found to include concepts and theories for the development of monastery meditation centers, the core concept of research which combined Eastern Buddhist theories with Western management concepts, the integrated approach which focused on the quality of life and the Satipatthana 4 curriculum as practiced by Buddhist Clerical retreat centers, as well as other forms of activities organized by non-clerical centers. 2) In general, a review of the organizational structures found that the large and medium non-clerical meditation centers was guided by each foundation’s Board of Directors while the Venerable Abbot of each monastic center was the sole authority in charge of organizing smaller meditation/retreat centers. 3) A comparative analysis between Buddhist Administrative Method of the Sanghas and non-clerical administration can be summarized as follows : The differences of the venerable and householders management were: Sanghas Corporation and the committee board of the householders’ management, manual instructions, unlimited different courses, Western style and proactive of the householders’ development and management, meanwhile monks’ limitation and the reactive style of Sanghas approached the same goal of management.4) The Sangha Administrative Method was consistent with the Buddha’s doctrine while non-clerical enterprises generally combined Dhamma with the Western management concepts. The principles of Dhamma focused on threefold training and Metta. All meditation centers were supposed to follow and transfer the practical approach to future generations, and to move forward to the application of Buddha Model.

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Research Articles