The Culture of Having Children in Southern Border Provinces

Main Article Content

Anlaya Smuseneto

Abstract

The study aimed to investigate the culture of having children in southernmost border provinces. The investigation was conducted by organizing a seminar in which the subjects were divided into 4 groups of 9 people. Each group consisted of elderly men and women, and young men and women. All were Muslims who were living in the southern border provinces—Pattani, Yala, Narathiwat and Satun. Although the total fertility rate in Thailand has fallen below the replacement level, it turned out that Muslims’ fertility rate was slightly higher. This was because of the great influence of the Islamic principles on Muslims’ beliefs and attitudes towards their living including having children. The findings revealed that according to the principles of Islam, men and women were encouraged to marry and have children to carry on the family. This belief had a significant effort on people practicing Islam, however, there were more people delaying having kids or staying single for the rest of their lives. The attitude that they should start families later in life and the fact that they did not select the gender of the baby could result in the decline of fertility. Additionally, it was found out that Muslims wanted to have big families while they were concerned about the cost of raising their children to have better lives and wanted the children’s education expenses. As parents, they wanted their children to have better lives and wanted the children to take care of them in old age. The subjects were found to be flexible to use temporary birth control methods for the interval between pregnancies and the good health of mothers. Besides, although the gender of the baby was not the major concern in Islamic principles, Muslim people hoped to have daughters to be responsible for elderly parents’ care.

Keywords

Article Details

Section
Research Article

References

[1] Chamratrittirong, Apichart. & Chulert, Panya. (2009). The Study of the Roles and Functions of Thai Families in Social and Demographic Transitions. In Phothisita, Chai. and Thaweesit, Suchada. (Eds.), Popolation and Society 2009 (pp.29-47). Handouts for the Annual Seminar. Nakhon Pathom: Institute of Population and Social Research, Mahidol University.

[2] Chayovan, Napaporn. (1989). Marriage Registration among Thai Women. In Institute of Population Studies (Eds.), Health and Population Studies Based on the 1987 Thailand Demographic and Health Survey (pp.205-221). Bangkok: Institute of Population Studies, Chulalongkorn University.

[3] Department of Provincial Administration. (2013). Statistical Information Services 2013. Retrieved January, 4 2014, from http://www.dopa.go.th/xstat/pop51_1html.

[4] Institute of Population and Social Research, Mahidol University. (2014). Population Gazette. Nakhon Pathom: Institute of Population and Social Research, Mahidol University.

[5] Jeaha, Muhummadsakee. (2011). Muslim Women. Bangkok: Islamic Academy.

[6] Khaosod Online. (2017). Ministry of Public Health invited Thai People Given Birth Children due to Low Reproductive Rate and Higher Single People Rate. Retrieved February 24, 2017, from https://www.khaosod.co.th/featured/news_211561.

[7] Ministry of Culture in Pattani. (2007). Pattani Information. Pattani: Ministry of Culture in Pattani.

[8] Matichon Online. (2017, February 25). Ministry of Public Health showed “Having Child to Thailand - Numbers of Thai People are not increased When the Birth Rate Equals the Death Rate. Retrieved from http://www.matichon.co.th/news/456699.

[9] National Statistics Office of Thailand. (n.d.(a)). Thai Population Census in 1990. Bangkok: The Prime Minister’s Office.

[10] National Statistics Office of Thailand. (2002). Thai Population Census in 2000. Bangkok: The Prime Minister’s Office.

[11] National Statistics Office of Thailand. (2011). Thai Population Census in 2010. Bangkok: The Prime Minister’s Office.

[12] Oppenheimer, V. K. (2003). Cohabiting and Marriage during Younger Men’s Career-Development Process. In Demography, 40(1), 127-149.

[13] Phothisita, Chai. (2009). The Introduction: What happened to Thai Families?. In Phothisita, Chai. & Thaweesit, Suchada. Population and Society 2009 (pp.1-6). Handouts for the Annual Seminar. Nakhon Pathom: Institute of Population and Social Research, Mahidol University.

[14] Prasartkul, Pramote. & Wapattanawong, Pattama. (2005). The Population Situation in Thailand in 2005. In Archavanitkul, Kritaya. & Prasartkul, Pramote. Population and Society 2005 (pp.14-31). Handouts for the Annual Seminar. Nakhon Pathom: Institute of Population and Social Research, Mahidol University.

[15] Seusaming, Ali. (2011). The Malays: Ways of Life and Culture of Bangkok Malays. Bangkok: Sarakadee.

[16] Sithirangsan, Varunee. (2017, February 18). Giving Birth to Country. Matichon Online, Retrieved from, http://www.matichon.co.th/news/467856.

[17] Smuseneto, Anlaya. (2013). Reproductive Health Behavior among Thai-Muslim in the Southernmost Border Povinces of Thailand In: 1st International Conference on Innovation and Sustainability (ICOIS 2013), 3-4 April 2013, Sunway Resort Hotel & Spa Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Retrieved from http://www.icois2013.uum.edu.my.

[18] Thaierform, Isranews Agency. (2016). Talk with Prof. Dr. Kua Wongboonsin in Thai becoming DINK Society into SING Society. Retrieved April 13, 2016, from http://www.isranews.org/isranews-article/item/46213-dinks13.html.

[19] United Nation Statistic Division. (2006). Demographic Year Book. Retrieved April 16, 2009, from http://unstats.un.org/unsd/demographic/products/dyb/dyb2006.htm.