Assessment of Mental Workload by Subjective Analysis Technique and Electroencephalography in the Sample Program Testing

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Prachuab Klomjit Phitsini Thanawiwat Sasi Ninlawat

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to study the assessment of mental workload by subjective analysis technique and electroencephalography in the sample program testing. The different types of the workload were assessment as follow: Evaluation of Posture Operation by RULA, Windows and Android operating systems and Manual. A performance of the research was divided on these three parts. First, studied and reviewed of the evaluation. Second, applied the evaluation form, NASA TASK LOAD INDEX (NASA-TLX) and compared with the brainwave of electroencephalography (EEG). Third, estimated and compared the performance of workload. A result of the assessment of mental workload by subjective analysis technique and electroencephalography. It can be concluded that. Evaluation of Posture Operation by RULA method. The heaviest workload is evaluated work postures using manual calculations. The minimum workload is RulaSU Android operating system.

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How to Cite
Klomjit, P., Thanawiwat, P., & Ninlawat, S. (2019). Assessment of Mental Workload by Subjective Analysis Technique and Electroencephalography in the Sample Program Testing. INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (ISJET), 3(1), 1-6. Retrieved from https://www.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/isjet/article/view/198894
Section
Research Article

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