Emerging global health challenges and integrated health models

Main Article Content

Bruce A. Wilcox

Abstract

Despite the achievements of modern biomedicine and public health in reducing the disease incidence and improving human well-being globally, emerging infectious diseases, and more recently, emerging chronic and degenerative diseases are reversing these gains.  New models and intervention approaches are needed that go beyond those of conventional biomedical and public health thinking and intervention approaches typically narrowly framed on the basis of reductionist models of health.  This paper reviews the application of the ecological perspective in public health and associated systems ecological-oriented frameworks for addressing these emerging disease crises.  Their utility as a means of integrative research and interventions that combine biomedical, social and environmental dimensions of health is increasingly being demonstrated.  The social-ecological systems framework, which only relatively recently has begun to be applied in health science and practice, is particularly promising.

Keywords

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How to Cite
Wilcox, B. (2019). Emerging global health challenges and integrated health models. Journal of Health Science and Alternative Medicine, 1(2), 1-6. Retrieved from https://www.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhealthscialternmed/article/view/210302
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Special Articles

References

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