Marriage in Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand: Who Delays, Who Does Not?

Main Article Content

Jidapa Phonchua Chai Podhisita Aree Jampaklay Jongjit Rittirong

Abstract

Delayed marriage is a global phenomenon, but in Thailand studies addressing this issue are limited. This study aims to analyze the factors associated with delayed marriage among Thai men and women in Kanchanaburi province. The analysis is based on a sample of 1,370 men and women aged 18-59 found in the Survey of Family and Household, 2010. Chi-squared analysis reveals women are more sensitive to ‘modernization variables’ - education, occupation, economic status, migration experience, residential area, and attitudes towards marriage and divorce. This is confirmed by results of the logit model analysis which reveals that only age, occupation, and attitudes towards marriage have a weak-moderate effect on delayed marriage among men, whereas among women, all variables were found to be significant, with the exception of occupation. This result supports the idea that delayed marriage, particularly among women, is sensitive to modernization. It suggests that with continuing development more men and women could delay marriage. Delayed marriage could be an opportunity for more investment in human resource development aimed at preparing young adults for the family life.

Article Details

How to Cite
Phonchua, J., Podhisita, C., Jampaklay, A., & Rittirong, J. (2017, October 1). Marriage in Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand: Who Delays, Who Does Not?. Journal of Population and Social Studies [JPSS], 25(4), 358-372. Retrieved from //www.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jpss/article/view/102394
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