The Factors Predicting Intimate Partner Violence among Pregnant Women with Sexually Transmitted Infections Factors Predicting Intimate Partner Violence among Pregnant Women with Sexually Transmitted Infections

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Hongsavadee Yothatip Nanthana Thananowan Chaweewan Yusamran Nopporn Vongsirimas

Abstract

This Predictive correlational research aimed to determine the predictive power of sexually transmitted disease, gestational age at first antenatal care, age at first sexual intercourse, condom use, husband’s alcohol drinking, and social support on intimate partner violence (IPV) among pregnant women with sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The sample consisted of 180 pregnant women with STIs who were treated at the Gynecologic Infectious Diseases and Female Sexually Transmitted Diseases Unit of the University Hospital in Bangkok. Data were collected by using six questionnaires: 1) Demographic Characteristics, 2) Sexual Intercourse, 3) Pregnancy, 4) Substance Use, 5) Medical Outcomes Study: Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS), and 6) Abuse Assessment Scale (AAS). The content validity of all questionnaires was judged by 3 experts. The reliability of questionnaires 5-6 were tested using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, yielding values of .97 and .78 respectively. Data analysis were performed by descriptive statistics, chi-square, independent t-test, and logistic regression.This Predictive correlational research aimed to determine the predictive power of sexually transmitted disease, gestational age at first antenatal care, age at first sexual intercourse, condom use, husband’s alcohol drinking, and social support on intimate partner violence (IPV) among pregnant women with sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The sample consisted of 180 pregnant women with STIs who were treated at the Gynecologic Infectious Diseases and Female Sexually Transmitted Diseases Unit of the University Hospital in Bangkok. Data were collected by using six questionnaires: 1) Demographic Characteristics, 2) Sexual Intercourse, 3) Pregnancy, 4) Substance Use, 5) Medical Outcomes Study: Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS), and 6) Abuse Assessment Scale (AAS). The content validity of all questionnaires was judged by 3 experts. The reliability of questionnaires 5-6 were tested using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, yielding values of .97 and .78 respectively. Data analysis were performed by descriptive statistics, chi-square, independent t-test, and logistic regression. The findings revealed overall prevalence of IPV was 29.4%. Five factors explained 78 percent of variance in IPV (Nagelkerke R2 = .78, p < .05). Gestational age at first antenatal care (OR = 5.20, p < .05), age at first sexual intercourse (OR = 7.68, p < .05), condom use (OR = 3.52, p < .05), husband’s alcohol drinking (OR = 4.58, p < .05), and social support (OR = .85, p < .05) were significant predictors of IPV among pregnant women with STIs. The results of this study are used as a guideline for the screening of risk factors associated with IPV and as a basis for research on violence in pregnant women with STIs. 

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บทความวิจัย

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