SURGICAL APPROACH FOR CERVICAL SPONDYLOTIC MYELOPATHY (CSM) IN POLICE GENERAL HOSPITAL

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โสภณรัชต์ สิงหจารุ

Abstract

             Police General Hospital had patients who complain of neck pain that refers to arm, arm weakness, numbness and decreased fine motor coordination. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most commonly seen in progressive chronic spondylosis causing cord compression by cervical disk, osteophyte, ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). CSM is one of the most severe symptoms in group of degenerative diseases of the spine. Progressive neurological deficits and failure of conservative treatment are indicated for cervical operation. Following to monitoring the cervical surgery approach to treat cervical spondylotic myelopathy in Police General Hospital: anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, posterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, and posterior cervical laminectomy and fusion. The operations have been done underneath microscope and microsurgical techniques. The result in 100 patients underwent cervical operation by microscope and microsurgical techniques, demonstrated excellent outcomes, decrease surgical complications at the cervical cord, nerve roots and vascular injuries in operation. Microscope and microsurgical techniques reduced neurological deficits, toward well recovery of the cervical cord and nerve roots after cervical compression in a long time.

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References

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