Quality Comparison of Nutmeg from Thailand and Indonesia

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Thaweeporn Keereekoch Thawatchai Srisuwan Natnaree Sangkaew Supakarn Pisitsupakul Benjawan Thongkhluean Sanan Subhadhirasakul

Abstract

This study was to compare the quality of nutmeg grown in Thailand and Indonesia by the standard test of the Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India. The nutmeg was divided accordingly to the five resources. Thai


This study was to compare the quality of nutmeg grown in Thailand and Indonesia by the standard test of the Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India. The nutmeg was divided accordingly to the five resources. Thai
nutmeg was from the four provinces, namely, Phangnga, Trang, Chumporn and Nakhon Si Thammarat. Indonesia nutmeg was from Maluku Islands. The results showed that nutmeg from Indonesia was higher quality than nutmeg from Thailand. Nutmeg from the southern west coast of Thailand was higher quality than the southern east coast of Thailand. The nutmeg from Phangnga province and Indonesia has passed the standard test. The ethanol-soluble extractive, ether-soluble extractive and essential oil content of Indonesia nutmeg was significantly higher than the Phangnga nutmeg. Although the water-soluble extractive was significantly lower than Phangnga nutmeg (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the analysis of essential oil from Phangnga and Indonesia nutmeg by GC-MS method indicated no differences between the major components, such as Sabinene, 4-Terpineol, Myristicin, Safrole and γ-Terpinene. However, the highest component of Phangnga nutmeg essential oil was Cis-Isoelemicin, whereas Indonesia nutmeg essential oil was Myristic acid.

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