DOCTORAL MUSIC PERFORMANCE: THE TECHNIQUE AND ASPECT OF SINGING FOR THAI BARITONE SINGERS

Main Article Content

วิภาต วิบูลย์ภาณุเวช รองศาสตราจารย์ ธงสรวง อิศรางกูร ณ อยุธยา

Abstract

        Doctoral Music Performance: The Technique and Aspect of Singing for Thai Baritone Singers Creative Music Performance. The performer is inspired by the interest of the singing students in the present. The performer studies the singing technique of national singers following: English, German, France, and Italian, bringing the strong points to merge with the Thai style singing to produce new methods of vocalization with the unique style of the performer.


        According to the protocol principle of the technique and the aspect of singing for Thai baritone singers, the performer focuses on the mechanical process of the body organs which is the four parts of the vocal source: (1) Motor (2) Vibrator (3) Resonator and (4) Articulator the production of controlling for creating techniques in the abstract transferred to concrete. The author positions the voice in different places to create a dimension of voice according to the order and portrays it in three following performances: (1) Crucifixion (2) Doctoral Voice Recital (3) The 3rd Chula International New Music Festival and Conference 2013.

Keywords

Article Details

How to Cite
วิบูลย์ภาณุเวชว., & อิศรางกูร ณ อยุธยาร. ธ. (2018). DOCTORAL MUSIC PERFORMANCE: THE TECHNIQUE AND ASPECT OF SINGING FOR THAI BARITONE SINGERS. Institute of Culture and Arts Journal, 19(2), 71-82. Retrieved from https://www.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jica/article/view/129918
Section
บทความวิจัย

References

Alan Riding and Leslie Dunton-Downer. (2006). Eyewitness Companions Opera. New York: DK Publishing.
Amanda Holden. (2001).The New Penguin Opera Guide. London: Penguin Group.
Clifton Ware. (1997). Basic of Vocal Pedagogy: the Foundations and Process of Singing. USA: The
McGraw-Hill Companies.
Fred Plotkin. (1994).Opera 101 a Complete Guide to Learning and Loving Opera. New York:
Hyperion Publictions.
Richard Millers. (1997). National Schools of Singing: English, French, German, and Italian Techniques of
Singing Revisited. USA: Scarecrow Press Inc.