The relationship between bridging exercise and standing balance in patients with stroke: A pilot study

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Jonjin Ratanapinunchai Lanna Chanyo

Abstract

Background: The bridging exercise is regarded  as one of the basic clinical therapeutic exercises in patients with stroke. There was no previous report on the relationship between bridging exercise and standing balance in patients with stroke.


Objective: To investigate the relationship between bridging exercise and standing balance in patients with stroke.


Methods: A cross-sectional assessment of 25 patients with stroke was performed. The subjective clinical assessment of the 5-point nominal scale of bridging exercise and the 9-point scale of standing balance were developed from data of preceding researches. The order of testing was randomly determined.


Results: The average scores of bridging exercise and standing balance were 2.28±0.79 points (median = 2) and 5.00±2.12 points (median = 6), respectively. There was a high positive correlation between bridging exercise and standing balance in patients with stroke (r = 0.876, p < 0.01). In addition, bridging exercise could predict 77% of ability of standing balance in patients with stroke.


Conclusion: For patients with stroke who have a good sitting balance, physical therapists might predict standing balance from the ability of bridging exercise. However, clinical application has to perform according to the defined criteria of bridging and standing balance tests.

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How to Cite
1.
Ratanapinunchai J, Chanyo L. The relationship between bridging exercise and standing balance in patients with stroke: A pilot study. Thai Journal of Physical Therapy [Internet]. 19Jun.2018 [cited 19Sep.2018];40(2):58-. Available from: https://www.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tjpt/article/view/129446
Section
Research Articles

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